Automatically mass-generate dhis2 usernames and passwords

In case you need to expedite creation of thousands of users and passwords the following classes might help. In essence, all of user creation steps can be done by sql. However, password hash is a bit tricky in dhis2 when it depends on Spring Security.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/GeneratePassword.java
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/RandomGenerator.java

After having a list of username and password pairs you can use sql to fill in users and userinfo tables, plus other germane tables for assigning orgunit and roles.

Thanh

Thanks for this. Looks very useful. Another way to do this (which I have mentioned before on the list, is with R). Here are a couple of R code fragments which I think I have sent previously.

#Generate the Java Hash Code. R does not calculate this properly, so we have to revert to using Java for now.

javaHashCode<-function(string="") {

require(rJava)

.jinit()

s ← .jnew(“java/lang/String”, string)

.jcall(s,“I”,“hashCode”) }

#Start to generate the encrypted passwords

genEncryptedPass<-function(password=“district”,username=“admin”) {

#This is needed for the digest function

require(digest)

digest(paste0(password,"{",javaHashCode(username),"}"),serialize=FALSE) }

#Start to build up the data frame here

result<-as.data.frame(cbind(usernames,passwords),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

result$encrypt<-mapply(genEncryptedPass,password=result$passwords,username=result$usernames)

So, with these two basic functions (javaHashCode and genEncryptedPass), you can generate the meat of what you need. If you have a list of usernames and passwords (which of course can also be generated in R) in a dataframe called “result”, the last line will give you the encrypted password.

Using SQL, you can then generate of course some insert statements or DXF to import into DHIS2. If anyone needs more code for this, I can provide some more details. I suspect the same thing could be easily done with other scripting languages as well.

I think these Java classes will help but would suggest to abstract out these methods a bit as right now, the DB connection is hard coded?

Regards,

Jason

···

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 4:26 PM, Ngoc Thanh Nguyen thanh.hispvietnam@gmail.com wrote:

In case you need to expedite creation of thousands of users and passwords the following classes might help. In essence, all of user creation steps can be done by sql. However, password hash is a bit tricky in dhis2 when it depends on Spring Security.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/GeneratePassword.java
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/RandomGenerator.java

After having a list of username and password pairs you can use sql to fill in users and userinfo tables, plus other germane tables for assigning orgunit and roles.

Thanh


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

I suspect what would be really useful is to have a VBA (or whatever the .net equivalent is) of this hash algorithm so that it can be easily used with excel.

I started picking the spring algorithm with java string hash apart once … got about 80% through then got bored and stuck with java.

···

On 5 July 2013 16:15, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks for this. Looks very useful. Another way to do this (which I have mentioned before on the list, is with R). Here are a couple of R code fragments which I think I have sent previously.

#Generate the Java Hash Code. R does not calculate this properly, so we have to revert to using Java for now.

javaHashCode<-function(string="") {

require(rJava)

.jinit()

s <- .jnew(“java/lang/String”, string)

.jcall(s,“I”,“hashCode”) }

#Start to generate the encrypted passwords

genEncryptedPass<-function(password=“district”,username=“admin”) {

#This is needed for the digest function

require(digest)

digest(paste0(password,"{",javaHashCode(username),"}"),serialize=FALSE) }

#Start to build up the data frame here

result<-as.data.frame(cbind(usernames,passwords),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

result$encrypt<-mapply(genEncryptedPass,password=result$passwords,username=result$usernames)

So, with these two basic functions (javaHashCode and genEncryptedPass), you can generate the meat of what you need. If you have a list of usernames and passwords (which of course can also be generated in R) in a dataframe called “result”, the last line will give you the encrypted password.

Using SQL, you can then generate of course some insert statements or DXF to import into DHIS2. If anyone needs more code for this, I can provide some more details. I suspect the same thing could be easily done with other scripting languages as well.

I think these Java classes will help but would suggest to abstract out these methods a bit as right now, the DB connection is hard coded?

Regards,

Jason


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 4:26 PM, Ngoc Thanh Nguyen thanh.hispvietnam@gmail.com wrote:

In case you need to expedite creation of thousands of users and passwords the following classes might help. In essence, all of user creation steps can be done by sql. However, password hash is a bit tricky in dhis2 when it depends on Spring Security.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/GeneratePassword.java
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/RandomGenerator.java

After having a list of username and password pairs you can use sql to fill in users and userinfo tables, plus other germane tables for assigning orgunit and roles.

Thanh


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

VBA? Really?

It is pretty simple actually… Look at the R code and it is “supersimple”. First you calculate the Java hash code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_hashCode()) of the user name and wrap this in curly braces and prepend the desired password. . Since the algorithm is well documented, I guess a creation of VBA function to do this should be simple. Concatenate the password and the hashed username together, and calculate the MD5 sum of that string. What results is the salted encrypted password which should work for DHIS2.

But then one either needs to create a series of SQL inserts (userinfo, users, usermembership, userrolemembers in that order) or I guess use DXF to import it all. Have done it in R, but not sure I want to try with VBA. :slight_smile:

Regards,

Jason

···

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 5:40 PM, Bob Jolliffe bobjolliffe@gmail.com wrote:

I suspect what would be really useful is to have a VBA (or whatever the .net equivalent is) of this hash algorithm so that it can be easily used with excel.

I started picking the spring algorithm with java string hash apart once … got about 80% through then got bored and stuck with java.

On 5 July 2013 16:15, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks for this. Looks very useful. Another way to do this (which I have mentioned before on the list, is with R). Here are a couple of R code fragments which I think I have sent previously.

#Generate the Java Hash Code. R does not calculate this properly, so we have to revert to using Java for now.

javaHashCode<-function(string="") {

require(rJava)

.jinit()

s ← .jnew(“java/lang/String”, string)

.jcall(s,“I”,“hashCode”) }

#Start to generate the encrypted passwords

genEncryptedPass<-function(password=“district”,username=“admin”) {

#This is needed for the digest function

require(digest)

digest(paste0(password,"{",javaHashCode(username),"}"),serialize=FALSE) }

#Start to build up the data frame here

result<-as.data.frame(cbind(usernames,passwords),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

result$encrypt<-mapply(genEncryptedPass,password=result$passwords,username=result$usernames)

So, with these two basic functions (javaHashCode and genEncryptedPass), you can generate the meat of what you need. If you have a list of usernames and passwords (which of course can also be generated in R) in a dataframe called “result”, the last line will give you the encrypted password.

Using SQL, you can then generate of course some insert statements or DXF to import into DHIS2. If anyone needs more code for this, I can provide some more details. I suspect the same thing could be easily done with other scripting languages as well.

I think these Java classes will help but would suggest to abstract out these methods a bit as right now, the DB connection is hard coded?

Regards,

Jason


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 4:26 PM, Ngoc Thanh Nguyen thanh.hispvietnam@gmail.com wrote:

In case you need to expedite creation of thousands of users and passwords the following classes might help. In essence, all of user creation steps can be done by sql. However, password hash is a bit tricky in dhis2 when it depends on Spring Security.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/GeneratePassword.java
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/RandomGenerator.java

After having a list of username and password pairs you can use sql to fill in users and userinfo tables, plus other germane tables for assigning orgunit and roles.

Thanh


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

Ah Jason I’ve been down this path (in tcl not surprisingly) …

You are almost correct. For short strings. But there is some conditional related to the length of the string. Don’t remember the details. I think the string hash code is run over a truncated string. I’ll leave that to someone more enthusiastic.

I mention VBA just because I guess excel would be a common environment for creating these masses of users. At least they did that in Rwanda. Mind you there is a horrible temptation to create these with simple and/or duplicate passwords.

···

On 5 July 2013 16:46, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

VBA? Really?

It is pretty simple actually… Look at the R code and it is “supersimple”. First you calculate the Java hash code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_hashCode()) of the user name and wrap this in curly braces and prepend the desired password. . Since the algorithm is well documented, I guess a creation of VBA function to do this should be simple. Concatenate the password and the hashed username together, and calculate the MD5 sum of that string. What results is the salted encrypted password which should work for DHIS2.

But then one either needs to create a series of SQL inserts (userinfo, users, usermembership, userrolemembers in that order) or I guess use DXF to import it all. Have done it in R, but not sure I want to try with VBA. :slight_smile:

Regards,

Jason

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 5:40 PM, Bob Jolliffe bobjolliffe@gmail.com wrote:

I suspect what would be really useful is to have a VBA (or whatever the .net equivalent is) of this hash algorithm so that it can be easily used with excel.

I started picking the spring algorithm with java string hash apart once … got about 80% through then got bored and stuck with java.

On 5 July 2013 16:15, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks for this. Looks very useful. Another way to do this (which I have mentioned before on the list, is with R). Here are a couple of R code fragments which I think I have sent previously.

#Generate the Java Hash Code. R does not calculate this properly, so we have to revert to using Java for now.

javaHashCode<-function(string="") {

require(rJava)

.jinit()

s <- .jnew(“java/lang/String”, string)

.jcall(s,“I”,“hashCode”) }

#Start to generate the encrypted passwords

genEncryptedPass<-function(password=“district”,username=“admin”) {

#This is needed for the digest function

require(digest)

digest(paste0(password,"{",javaHashCode(username),"}"),serialize=FALSE) }

#Start to build up the data frame here

result<-as.data.frame(cbind(usernames,passwords),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

result$encrypt<-mapply(genEncryptedPass,password=result$passwords,username=result$usernames)

So, with these two basic functions (javaHashCode and genEncryptedPass), you can generate the meat of what you need. If you have a list of usernames and passwords (which of course can also be generated in R) in a dataframe called “result”, the last line will give you the encrypted password.

Using SQL, you can then generate of course some insert statements or DXF to import into DHIS2. If anyone needs more code for this, I can provide some more details. I suspect the same thing could be easily done with other scripting languages as well.

I think these Java classes will help but would suggest to abstract out these methods a bit as right now, the DB connection is hard coded?

Regards,

Jason


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 4:26 PM, Ngoc Thanh Nguyen thanh.hispvietnam@gmail.com wrote:

In case you need to expedite creation of thousands of users and passwords the following classes might help. In essence, all of user creation steps can be done by sql. However, password hash is a bit tricky in dhis2 when it depends on Spring Security.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/GeneratePassword.java
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/RandomGenerator.java

After having a list of username and password pairs you can use sql to fill in users and userinfo tables, plus other germane tables for assigning orgunit and roles.

Thanh


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

Again, look at the R code. I tried to do this in pure R, but it didn’t work. Therefore, I call the Java class directly to calculate the hashCode. I suppose one could delve into the depths of this part of the Java source code, but I did not go there. Easier just to call the Java class directly and not try and remake the wheel.

Regards,

Jason

···

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 6:10 PM, Bob Jolliffe bobjolliffe@gmail.com wrote:

Ah Jason I’ve been down this path (in tcl not surprisingly) …

You are almost correct. For short strings. But there is some conditional related to the length of the string. Don’t remember the details. I think the string hash code is run over a truncated string. I’ll leave that to someone more enthusiastic.

I mention VBA just because I guess excel would be a common environment for creating these masses of users. At least they did that in Rwanda. Mind you there is a horrible temptation to create these with simple and/or duplicate passwords.

On 5 July 2013 16:46, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

VBA? Really?

It is pretty simple actually… Look at the R code and it is “supersimple”. First you calculate the Java hash code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_hashCode()) of the user name and wrap this in curly braces and prepend the desired password. . Since the algorithm is well documented, I guess a creation of VBA function to do this should be simple. Concatenate the password and the hashed username together, and calculate the MD5 sum of that string. What results is the salted encrypted password which should work for DHIS2.

But then one either needs to create a series of SQL inserts (userinfo, users, usermembership, userrolemembers in that order) or I guess use DXF to import it all. Have done it in R, but not sure I want to try with VBA. :slight_smile:

Regards,

Jason

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 5:40 PM, Bob Jolliffe bobjolliffe@gmail.com wrote:

I suspect what would be really useful is to have a VBA (or whatever the .net equivalent is) of this hash algorithm so that it can be easily used with excel.

I started picking the spring algorithm with java string hash apart once … got about 80% through then got bored and stuck with java.

On 5 July 2013 16:15, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks for this. Looks very useful. Another way to do this (which I have mentioned before on the list, is with R). Here are a couple of R code fragments which I think I have sent previously.

#Generate the Java Hash Code. R does not calculate this properly, so we have to revert to using Java for now.

javaHashCode<-function(string="") {

require(rJava)

.jinit()

s ← .jnew(“java/lang/String”, string)

.jcall(s,“I”,“hashCode”) }

#Start to generate the encrypted passwords

genEncryptedPass<-function(password=“district”,username=“admin”) {

#This is needed for the digest function

require(digest)

digest(paste0(password,"{",javaHashCode(username),"}"),serialize=FALSE) }

#Start to build up the data frame here

result<-as.data.frame(cbind(usernames,passwords),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

result$encrypt<-mapply(genEncryptedPass,password=result$passwords,username=result$usernames)

So, with these two basic functions (javaHashCode and genEncryptedPass), you can generate the meat of what you need. If you have a list of usernames and passwords (which of course can also be generated in R) in a dataframe called “result”, the last line will give you the encrypted password.

Using SQL, you can then generate of course some insert statements or DXF to import into DHIS2. If anyone needs more code for this, I can provide some more details. I suspect the same thing could be easily done with other scripting languages as well.

I think these Java classes will help but would suggest to abstract out these methods a bit as right now, the DB connection is hard coded?

Regards,

Jason


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 4:26 PM, Ngoc Thanh Nguyen thanh.hispvietnam@gmail.com wrote:

In case you need to expedite creation of thousands of users and passwords the following classes might help. In essence, all of user creation steps can be done by sql. However, password hash is a bit tricky in dhis2 when it depends on Spring Security.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/GeneratePassword.java
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/RandomGenerator.java

After having a list of username and password pairs you can use sql to fill in users and userinfo tables, plus other germane tables for assigning orgunit and roles.

Thanh


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

Hi Jason and Bob,

Thanks for rich information about various alternatives of this batched user creation. Actually, someone pointed me to an email written by Jason about this topic but the technique in use was R which I am out of competence, thus I did not know that R can invoke a Java class.

Therefore, I was reluctantly looking at dhis2 module and try to mimic this user-generator process. Above all of solutions, excel seems to be a good way as it helps non-dev people to be involved. However, it might have to also solve the problem of updating database which again will require either sql or other scripting language. I think the best approach could be we institutionalize this process by making an online utility that can generate a sql file (or dxf whatever easier and more convenient) that users can copy and run on their db.

Thanh

···

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 11:58 PM, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

Again, look at the R code. I tried to do this in pure R, but it didn’t work. Therefore, I call the Java class directly to calculate the hashCode. I suppose one could delve into the depths of this part of the Java source code, but I did not go there. Easier just to call the Java class directly and not try and remake the wheel.

Regards,

Jason

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 6:10 PM, Bob Jolliffe bobjolliffe@gmail.com wrote:

Ah Jason I’ve been down this path (in tcl not surprisingly) …

You are almost correct. For short strings. But there is some conditional related to the length of the string. Don’t remember the details. I think the string hash code is run over a truncated string. I’ll leave that to someone more enthusiastic.

I mention VBA just because I guess excel would be a common environment for creating these masses of users. At least they did that in Rwanda. Mind you there is a horrible temptation to create these with simple and/or duplicate passwords.

On 5 July 2013 16:46, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

VBA? Really?

It is pretty simple actually… Look at the R code and it is “supersimple”. First you calculate the Java hash code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_hashCode()) of the user name and wrap this in curly braces and prepend the desired password. . Since the algorithm is well documented, I guess a creation of VBA function to do this should be simple. Concatenate the password and the hashed username together, and calculate the MD5 sum of that string. What results is the salted encrypted password which should work for DHIS2.

But then one either needs to create a series of SQL inserts (userinfo, users, usermembership, userrolemembers in that order) or I guess use DXF to import it all. Have done it in R, but not sure I want to try with VBA. :slight_smile:

Regards,

Jason

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 5:40 PM, Bob Jolliffe bobjolliffe@gmail.com wrote:

I suspect what would be really useful is to have a VBA (or whatever the .net equivalent is) of this hash algorithm so that it can be easily used with excel.

I started picking the spring algorithm with java string hash apart once … got about 80% through then got bored and stuck with java.

On 5 July 2013 16:15, Jason Pickering jason.p.pickering@gmail.com wrote:

Thanks for this. Looks very useful. Another way to do this (which I have mentioned before on the list, is with R). Here are a couple of R code fragments which I think I have sent previously.

#Generate the Java Hash Code. R does not calculate this properly, so we have to revert to using Java for now.

javaHashCode<-function(string="") {

require(rJava)

.jinit()

s <- .jnew(“java/lang/String”, string)

.jcall(s,“I”,“hashCode”) }

#Start to generate the encrypted passwords

genEncryptedPass<-function(password=“district”,username=“admin”) {

#This is needed for the digest function

require(digest)

digest(paste0(password,"{",javaHashCode(username),"}"),serialize=FALSE) }

#Start to build up the data frame here

result<-as.data.frame(cbind(usernames,passwords),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)

result$encrypt<-mapply(genEncryptedPass,password=result$passwords,username=result$usernames)

So, with these two basic functions (javaHashCode and genEncryptedPass), you can generate the meat of what you need. If you have a list of usernames and passwords (which of course can also be generated in R) in a dataframe called “result”, the last line will give you the encrypted password.

Using SQL, you can then generate of course some insert statements or DXF to import into DHIS2. If anyone needs more code for this, I can provide some more details. I suspect the same thing could be easily done with other scripting languages as well.

I think these Java classes will help but would suggest to abstract out these methods a bit as right now, the DB connection is hard coded?

Regards,

Jason


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp

On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 4:26 PM, Ngoc Thanh Nguyen thanh.hispvietnam@gmail.com wrote:

In case you need to expedite creation of thousands of users and passwords the following classes might help. In essence, all of user creation steps can be done by sql. However, password hash is a bit tricky in dhis2 when it depends on Spring Security.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/GeneratePassword.java
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/63702128/dhis2%20user%20generator/RandomGenerator.java

After having a list of username and password pairs you can use sql to fill in users and userinfo tables, plus other germane tables for assigning orgunit and roles.

Thanh


Mailing list: https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

Post to : dhis2-devs@lists.launchpad.net

Unsubscribe : https://launchpad.net/~dhis2-devs

More help : https://help.launchpad.net/ListHelp